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Current member

If you die in service, the LGPS will ensure that your family is supported. The scheme provides:

  • A lump sum death grant (equivalent to three years’ pay)

Regardless of how long you have been a member of the scheme, the LGPS provides a lump sum payment, as long as you are under 75 at the date of death. For part-time employees, it is three times your actual part-time pay (disregarding any reduction in your pay if your hours had been reduced due to illness).

  • A survivor’s pension

Your spouse or registered civil partner will automatically qualify for a survivor’s pension.

  • A pension for your children

Children will receive benefits if under the age of 18 or 23 if they are in full time education. Depending on personal circumstances, some disabled children are entitled to a pension beyond the age of 23.

Deferred member

A deferred member is one that has stopped paying into the scheme but is not yet receiving a pension. As a deferred member, the scheme provides:

  • A lump sum death grant

Payable for a deferred member is 5 times the deferred pension that would have been put into payment.

  • A survivor’s pension

Your spouse or registered civil partner will automatically qualify for a survivor’s pension.

  • A pension for your children

Children will receive benefits if under the age of 18 or 23 if they are in full time education. Depending on personal circumstances, some disabled children are entitled to a pension beyond the age of 23.

If you are already in receipt of a pension

  • A lump sum death grant

A pensioner will receive 10 times the annual pension, less the amount of pension that has already paid.

  • A survivor’s pension

Your spouse or registered civil partner will automatically qualify for a survivor’s pension.

  • A pension for your children

Children will receive benefits if under the age of 18 or 23 if they are in full time education. Depending on personal circumstances, some disabled children are entitled to a pension beyond the age of 23.

Cohabiting partners

If you’re living with a partner who is not your husband, wife or civil partner, they will not be automatically covered by the LGPS when you die. For your partner to be eligible to receive a survivor’s pension, there are a number of conditions that must be met:

  • You and your partner must have been free to marry or form a civil partnership for at least 2 years
  • You and your partner must have been living together for at least 2 years
  • Neither of you have lived with another person within those 2 years, for example ex-husband/wife or civil partner
  • Your partner is financially dependent on you or you are financially interdependent on each other.

Please note:

Your partner is financially dependent on you if you have the highest income. Financially interdependent means you rely on your joint finances to support your standard of living.

In order for the surviving partner to receive the pension, they will have to provide evidence that the above conditions are met at the time of your death.

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